New Podcast Episode – What It’s Like to Work With a Literary Agent

In this episode of the “All Things Book Marketing” podcast, we talk to literary agent Lynn Johnston about how authors can work with agents, what they can do to get noticed, published and other tips and tricks including the importance of platform, social media, and author websites. Lynn talks about trends she is seeing and we can expect publishers will seek in 2020.

PODCAST TRANSCRIPT:

Welcome to the Smith Publicity All Things Book Marketing podcast, the best tips, insights, and advice from the best in the publishing industry.

Mike Onorato:

Hello, and welcome to the All Things Book Marketing podcast. I’m your host, Mike Onorato. Joining us today is Lynn Johnston of Lynn Johnston literary. Lynn is a literary agent in New York City, representing mostly nonfiction and a small selection of fiction titles since 2001. I worked with Lynn on For Such A Time As This by Sharon Risher, published by Chalice Press.

Mike Onorato:

Lynn has an MBA and a BA in Philosophy. And before publishing, she worked in management consulting and marketing and has served on the board or staff of notable nonprofit organizations such as Dress For Success, Bottomless Closet, and the American Bar Association. She currently serves on the advisory board of the Woodstock Bookfest, where she will be leading a publishing workshop on March 27th of this year. More information on the Fest and her workshop can be found at www.woodstockbookfest.com.

Mike Onorato:

Lynn, welcome!

Lynn Johnston:

Good morning! Thank you for having me on this podcast.

Mike Onorato:

Of course! Thank you for participating, and I promise it’ll hopefully be smoother than the testing of the audio went this morning.

Mike Onorato:

So Lynn, off the bat, right off the top to start, what should authors know about working with an agent?

Lynn Johnston:

Well, I think the big picture to keep in mind is that an agent is part of an ecosystem, and everybody in that ecosystem has certain goals and parameters that they’re working with. So there isn’t one person, an agent, who can make or break you, who can make you a bestselling author. That agent is trying to find projects based on the editors that they know and what those editors are looking for. And those editors are, in turn, looking for projects that they can pitch to their editorial board, and the editorial board will get approved. And then the publisher is looking for books that the accounts, i.e., bookstores, are going to stock. And the PR person in the room is thinking, “How can I place this?”

Lynn Johnston:

So everybody’s got their piece of this pie. And understanding what people are looking for will help authors and potential authors hone their pitch, think about how to talk to an agent, what an agent’s going to respond to because that person is probably the first stop in a lot of different stations.

Mike Onorato:

Is it fair to say that often during the process of this that everybody’s various needs will sort of pull and sort of tug at the author as they’re doing it? And I ask that because having spent 12 years in-house myself, I was in a lot of those discussions. And you’re right, and as someone in publicity, I had one set of goals. And of course, our publisher and editorial team and our sales team, everybody had a variety and battling goals. So is it fair to say that, during the lifeblood of this process, those goals and needs can pull at the author?

Lynn Johnston:

I’m not sure I understand what you’re asking, but yes, the author has to meet a lot of needs.

Lynn Johnston:

So I had a conversation yesterday with a client, and we were talking about a potential project, and the client said, “Well, they published a book similar to this. So, you know, let’s talk to them because they might be interested in this because it’s similar.”

Lynn Johnston:

Yes and no, because I wasn’t sure that that other book sold well enough for them to be interested in doing a similar model. So there are a lot of things that are going on when you’re looking at a project and evaluating a project.

Mike Onorato:

That was precisely my question was just that there are so many different things at play.

Lynn Johnston:

Yeah.

Mike Onorato:

And rarely, I guess, is everybody sort of on the same page, pun intended. And you get a lot of different voices that are going to want different things and that puts the awkward, it puts the author, I should say, in an awkward spot.

Mike Onorato:

Talk about the process, if you will, of acquiring manuscripts and projects. And one of the questions that we got was, how do you find potential authors?

Lynn Johnston:

I find them a lot of different ways, and I think that’s the same with most agents. Referrals are a huge part of my list. Your authors are your best salespeople, so they’re out there in the world, they’re talking about their projects, and inevitably people approach them: “Hey, I’ve got a book.” And if they know them and they feel like this is a worthwhile project, they’ll refer you. So I get a lot of referrals, and I take them seriously because my authors know me, and that speaks a lot for those referrals. I get a lot of inquiries. Some agents, especially on the fiction side, blind queries, make up a big part of their list. I would say for publishers, especially the big publishers, that’s not the route you want to go, and that’s probably what we’re going to talk about at some point.

Lynn Johnston:

But just sending a publisher a query about your project, especially if it’s a big publisher, is probably not going to be as fruitful as working through an agent. Some smaller publishers, they welcome blind queries. You just kind of have to know what you’re looking for.

Lynn Johnston:

I also seek projects. “There’s a topic.” “Wow, there should be a book on this. I’ll look to see who’s the expert on that.” Sometimes I’m in conversation with an editor, and they’re talking about, “I’d love to see a book on…” So then maybe sometimes we work on it together, or sometimes I’m just working on it to try to figure out who the best author for that particular project would be.

Mike Onorato:

And that to me is so interesting, is the way you seek that because often authors are asking, “How do I get the attention of an agent? What can I do? Do I just send them my book? Do I send them an email? Do I send them a query?” One time and I’m chuckling [inaudible 00:07:19], it’s not funny, but it’s just I sort of felt for this author when they said, “I just went on LinkedIn and just started to friend every agent I could find.” And, at some point, I guess critical mass is important. You need to reach out to people. But is there-

Lynn Johnston:

An agent friend of mine says he gets projects from LinkedIn.

Mike Onorato:

Really?

Lynn Johnston:

So that’s not necessarily, you know, “don’t do that.” He might be looking for projects, and I didn’t delve. I’m not on LinkedIn myself, so I can’t speak to that, specifically. But I am on social media, and I do see people. That is a place to be visible. That is a place to get attention from people. It’s a way to build your name, recognition of your name. So those aren’t terrible. I don’t know if that’s going to lead directly to a book, but if you’re looking to be a published author, it’s always a good idea to be out there with the topic that you want to write on.

Mike Onorato:

Right, right. So is the process where someone would send an overview of a book they’re thinking about, obviously they’re not going to write the entire book, get it fully baked, but what does that physically look like from your end when you receive a query? Again, is it a detailed outline? Is it sort of just like an overview?

Lynn Johnston:

Yeah. Well, every agent has submission guidelines. So I would encourage you to look at each agent’s submission guidelines because it is different. They are looking for different things. Some agents are close to queries at certain times, and they’ll announce that either on their website or on Twitter or something like that. And that means that if you’re going to send them something, they’re not even going to consider it at the time. So I would definitely look at the submission guidelines.

Lynn Johnston:

For me, I need to know what the project is about. But as necessary as that, I need to know who the author is. And that’s important in nonfiction. I mentioned that sometimes I’ll be talking to an editor and we’ll have an idea for a book. Well, I could sit around with a bunch of publishing people, and we could come up with a dozen ideas of potential good books to publish. But the real issue is you have to find the right author for those books. And then, not only do you have to find the right profile author, but words have to be written on the page, and they have to have the right voice and the content and all of that stuff, so there’s a lot that goes into it.

Lynn Johnston:

So in a query, what I’m looking for is, what are the chances that everything is going to come together for this particular project? So it is the topic, and that’s why submission guidelines are important. I get queries every day for fiction projects, and I don’t handle fiction except for, really, for my current clients. So I’m not looking at those at all. And so that’s just an easy pass, and it’s not even worth querying me on fiction projects. And that’s in my submission guidelines. B.

Lynn Johnston:

ut beyond that, then I’m looking for, “Okay, this is nonfiction. Is this a topic that I’m interested in? Is this a topic that I think could potentially be a book?” A note on that is a lot of topics might work best as long-form. So, you know, a New Yorker article. But is it really a book? Is it something that somebody’s going to pay $27 for a hardcover on? Or $20 for a trade paperback? Or is it something they want to read and move on? It could be great. It just might not be a book.

Lynn Johnston:

Then, beyond that, who’s the author? Who’s querying me? Does this person have credentials? There are some topics that you need credentials to write on. So I look for credentials. I look for why this person is writing it. What’s the passion behind the project? So there are a lot of things that go into it. I don’t necessarily judge the writing of the query for what’s going to be the writing in the eventual manuscript. But that query does need to speak to me. It needs to convey all of these things. So there are a lot of things that do go in a query.

Mike Onorato:

Right, right. How important at this stage is the platform, is their website, is their social media, if they’re commenting or blogging about the topic regularly, how important is that to you at this stage?

Lynn Johnston:

Well, look. The first thing, if I’m interested in a project, is I’ll probably Google the name. And that’s what a publisher is going to do, too. So every potential author should look at what their digital footprint looks like.

Mike Onorato:

I love that phrase, by the way, “digital footprint.” I’d never heard that.

Lynn Johnston:

I’m sure I didn’t make that up.

Mike Onorato:

Yeah, no, it’s great.

Lynn Johnston:

So the question is, what do you look like online when your name gets Googled? Probably the worst thing that can happen is nothing comes up like I can’t find you, especially if you have a common name. So if your name is John Smith and you have a website, put that website in the query. Twitter, the same thing, your Twitter handle. If there is anything you want me to look at online, then put that in the query. So if I can’t find you, that’s going to be a problem because if you’re an expert, you’re not an expert, then. And not saying you’re not an expert, but how are media outlets going to find you to talk about this topic if you don’t show up digitally?

Lynn Johnston:

So all of those things go into the process of, “Is this the right author for this topic?” So I would put everything there that you would want me to look at, from a digital point of view, if you’re hard to find. If you come up, I’m impressed (if your name is John Smith, by the way), and you come up first in my Google search. Because somehow you have wrestled all the John Smiths, and you have come up first. So there is something to having a digital and social media in some ways, presence.

Lynn Johnston:

That said, that’s not everything. So social media isn’t everything. I have authors who don’t have a social media presence. I have some that, because of their book, they’ve had to hire people. They’ve had to get interns. They’ve had to get students, some of them are professors, to help them with their social media. So that’s not the only thing. If you’ve got credentials, you’re known in what you want to write about, and then social media may not be as important. But if you’re not so well known, then social media does become much more of an [inaudible 00:15:09] part of the decision.

Mike Onorato:

Got it. Interesting, interesting. Because I’ve read so many articles that talk about being active somewhere and how crucial it is to just be active on social and, again, on your website and other things, almost to the extent that that’s the most important thing. But it’s so interesting to hear that that may not be the case. It’s part and parcel of so many other things [inaudible 00:15:36].

Lynn Johnston:

Yeah. I don’t think so because I have seen some accounts where they have a huge following, but they have virtually no engagement. So, posting something and there’s just nothing that comes from that. So then my question is, why such a huge following without the engagement? So I don’t think that the numbers are everything. It is really how strongly people feel about you so that when your book comes out, that intensity translates into potential book buyers.

Mike Onorato:

Right, right. Switching gears, to talk about traditional publishers, and when I began my career at Wiley many, many generations ago, one of the things that we heard was that traditional publishers will only work with projects that have an agent attached to them, or as we used to say, “are agented.” Is that still the case?

Lynn Johnston:

Well, it depends on the kind of publisher. So I would say the big houses, that’s mostly true. I was on a panel, and this was a while ago, so you got to take it with a grain of salt, it was probably eight, nine years ago, with a bunch of agents and editors. And somebody in the audience asked the editors who were from the big houses how many projects they had worked on without an agent. And it was like zero. 0%. So I would say with the big publishers, yes. And even if you talk to an editor and they want to acquire your project, and they work for a big a house, they’re probably going to recommend some agents for you to work with even if they want to acquire your project. So I would say just for ease of working, a lot of editors, at least in the big houses, prefer to work with an agent.

Mike Onorato:

Got it.

Lynn Johnston:

Now, there are tons of publishers beyond those that welcome authors approaching them directly. So if you don’t have an agent, that doesn’t mean you’re not going to get published at all. It also doesn’t mean that a big house isn’t going to want to publish you. They might steer you to an agent to handle all the other stuff, to help you. And if you have a publisher willing to work with you, why wouldn’t you work with an agent? You’re going to be able to find an agent probably if you have a publishing contract that somebody wants to execute.

Lynn Johnston:

And part of understanding that is understanding that an agent does more than placing a project. There are lots of things an agent works on beyond just placing your project with a publisher.

Mike Onorato:

And some of those are?

Lynn Johnston:

Well, if you have a problem, an agent is the best to deal with that. If you want to deliver the manuscript later, if you have any conflict with the editor, if you don’t see eye-to-eye on where, editorially, things go. Once the manuscript is submitted and it’s accepted, then an agent can help you to figure out how to best plan for your publication, how to best get resources geared up in the house. Just because you have a contract does not mean that you’re going to get 100% of the resources devoted to you. There are lots of questions, and probably in the production process, you’re not quite sure what you need to do.

Lynn Johnston:

Even small things like acknowledgments in your book. Who should you acknowledge? An agent can help you with that. Once the book gets published, looking at what happens, keeping track of royalties and sales. There are lots of things you can do for yourself, but why?

Mike Onorato:

For sure. What are some of the things that may turn you off of a project? And not so much the subject or the genre, but certain things that you may say, “Oh, I can’t pursue this,” or “I don’t want to work with this particular author.”

Lynn Johnston:

Well, publishing is a long cycle of work. So by the time you’re working on your proposal, you’re submitting the proposal, maybe you have to submit a couple of times, there’s a couple of rounds there. Then you’re working a year on the manuscript, then perhaps another nine months to publication, then another year to paperback publication. It’s a long time you’re working with somebody. So having rapport, you don’t have to be best friends, but having rapport, having professional respect for each other, that goes a long way in this process.

Lynn Johnston:

So that is part of what every agent considers when taking on a new project. “Can I work with this person?” “Is there mutual respect?” “Are we speaking the same language?” “Can we deal with conflict together?” “Are we really listening to each other?” So those are all the things that, if you get to a point where you’re actually talking to an agent, just kind of know that on the other side those are some of the things that an agent is thinking of. Because it isn’t just, “Can I sell this project?” There is always going to be another book project. Always. So part of it is, am I going to emerge from this alive, basically, and figuring out that rapport.

Mike Onorato:

Right, and it is so interesting. It all comes down to those relationships, right? And you’re investing a lot of your time, as well, and your resources into something, and it needs to be a good fit from both ends.

Lynn Johnston:

Well, absolutely, because agents work on spec. So most agents aren’t going to get paid until the author gets paid, and not every project gets placed, sadly. You have to pick and choose wisely if you’re an agent; otherwise, you’re going to go out of business. So part of this is “I’m doing this basically on spec,” and you have to choose not only the project but the author you’re going to work with.

Mike Onorato:

Right. Has there ever been a time where you’ve based on that spec, and you read something, and you’re on board, it sounds interesting, the author’s got the goods, they have the credentials, they turn in something to you, and it’s just not what you’re looking for, or it’s just horribly written, has that ever happened? Or I guess the better question is, how often does that happen?

Lynn Johnston:

Horribly written can be dealt with. There are lots of freelance editors, coaches, even ghostwriters if needed. So that’s usually not so much the issue. It’s getting the material so that it’s ready for submission. You have to have an author who is willing to work with you to get there. Sometimes you get a query, and the proposal is already put together, and everything looks great, and you really only need a couple of passes, and you’re there. That’s pretty rare, honestly.

Lynn Johnston:

More likely, you get something, and the author is right, the topic is right, and the material is almost there. Sometimes you have to refocus the material, refocus even the… not the topic, but how it’s positioned so that it works in book form. So part of that is really working with the author to figure out what the right publishing formula is. And an author, coming in, knows the topic, the subject matter, but how it works in publishing is really where an agent can be helpful. And I find the biggest issue there is when the author resists that. It’s not the writing so much, and it’s resisting looking at the material from a publishing point of view.

Mike Onorato:

For sure. What is the single most important thing an author can do to get an agent’s attention?

Lynn Johnston:

Wow. Having a group of people who feel passionate and evangelical about you and what you stand for and the work you’re doing goes a long way, more so than beautiful writing, more so than an obvious big platform. It’s really about the topic and the people who see you as the center of that topic and feel strongly about it because those people are going to translate into buyers.

Lynn Johnston:

So that’s kind of what all of this gets to. That’s what publishers are looking for. That’s what agents are looking for. So when [inaudible 00:25:58] talk about platform, that’s what, really, we’re looking for when you say platform, you know, does that mean that people know this person for this topic and feel strongly about it. You could have a good platform, but if it isn’t the right book for the platform and people aren’t going to buy it, then it’s not necessarily the right platform.

Lynn Johnston:

So I’m really looking for… they call it “tribe,” that’s the buzzword. I don’t know if I like to use buzzwords so much, but they’re looking for, and when I say “they,” I’m talking about publishers because that’s really what an agent is a stand-in for. They’re trying to figure out what the publisher is looking for and trying to channel that into projects. So, looking for that tribe of people who are going to come to your book when it publishes.

Mike Onorato:

That’s it. I’m sure that is the intersection of where/how important this all is, is who is your audience and who’s going to be the ones that are buying this book? Boy, I’ve been in so many meetings in-house when that was the question, and that was the discussion.

Lynn Johnston:

I mean, I think a lot of people make the mistake of thinking, “The book is going to build my audience.” And yes, the book is a calling card, and it is a way for you to be out there more than you are. But the book is probably the hardest way to build your audience because it requires people plunking down money. And in some cases, $27, which isn’t spare change.

Lynn Johnston:

So there are other ways to build people to followers. On social media, it doesn’t cost anything. You just have to get their attention, which, admittedly, is also hard to do. But it’s a little less hard than getting people’s attention and then getting them to reach in their pocketbook and pay $27. So the thing is, how do you build that audience in a much more frictionless way than a book?

Mike Onorato:

For sure. And I think it’s so interesting, too. We deal with so many authors, and we read so many pieces, industry pieces in PW and others, that talk about your network and making sure that you’re tapped into them and what’s the way to go about that. And I think a lot of authors think, to your point, that, “Oh, the book will be the vehicle that gets me this attention,” “The book will be the vehicle that I use to get buzz,” and it’s the other way around, right?

Lynn Johnston:

Yeah.

Mike Onorato:

You need to sort of have that be a byproduct of it.

Lynn Johnston:

It is. The book almost needs to feel like, “Oh, of course, this person’s going to write a book about that” because they’ve already written an op-ed that got a lot of debate or they already put on workshops on the topic, or they have a social media presence where people are talking about this topic, whether it’s a Facebook group or whatever. It almost has to be like, “Of course this person is the right person.”

Mike Onorato:

Right, right, right. Are there trends that you’re noticing when it comes to either genres or subjects that your publisher contacts are demanding for? I know we’re in the early part of 2020 and we’re getting into a hotly contested political news cycle, and so are there certain genres that they’re looking for that you’re hearing? Or maybe another way to ask the question, Lynn, is are there subjects that publishers don’t want to touch?

Lynn Johnston:

Well, I think that politics is getting pretty saturated. So I’m not sure that beyond the books that are already being published, already slated for publication, there’s going to be a lot of new acquisitions in politics. I could be wrong. I think this year there’s going to be a lot of counterprogramming, books that don’t require media to sell. So again, getting back to an author who’s got a ready-made tribe of people because it’s been very hard to break the news cycle. You have somebody who’s going… And I think this might’ve happened to us, Mike, on our project.

Mike Onorato:

Right.

Lynn Johnston:

You have a book that’s all teed to go, it’s going to go on a morning show, and there’s breaking news. And now, your author is postponed. The next day, your author is still postponed. “All right, we’re going to do it a month from now.” More breaking news, you know? Okay, well, that’s not going to happen. That’s been going on for the past couple of years, at least, and it’s wreaked havoc on books that have traditionally depended on that kind of news coverage to get buzz. So that’s going to be a casualty, another [inaudible 00:31:11] I don’t know if it’s a casualty. But the fall publishing season, probably not going to see as many books, or as many serious nonfiction books, that we’ve done in previous years. Fall is normally the season for serious non- [inaudible 00:31:31] fiction, therefore the big books. But what’s going to happen? We’ve got all of this news happening. Serious nonfiction requires news coverage. Probably not going to see that. I think we’re going to see a lot of books pushed to spring 2021, so that’s going to be a super-competitive season.

Lynn Johnston:

So there’s stuff like that going on. But trends themselves that authors can respond to, I hate to talk about that because I get reports, especially from my foreign rights manager, about what’s selling and different trends in various parts of the world. It’s hard to respond to that because of the book production cycle. So kind of by the time a trend is hitting already or an author recognizes a trend, by the time you can get a manuscript, you get it placed, you go through the publishing cycle, you get it sold in the bookstores, that trend has passed. So I would say, for trend, is to try to do what you know, what you know your followers want, and then have your agent help you try to figure out the right timing for that.

Mike Onorato:

Right. That has to be such a challenge when you’re working in nonfiction because by the time something is in the news and is of note and of discussion, by the time a book is able to come to life and then come to market, it’s past that and-

Lynn Johnston:

Yeah. You have to look ahead. And sometimes you have books that just hit it right. The publisher didn’t know it was going to; it just did. After the election, everybody was looking at, for example, Hillbilly Elegy. The publisher didn’t know that that was going to be the case. But it became this monster hit because people were trying to understand something.

Mike Onorato:

It’s so interesting that we talk about the new cycle and the publisher not knowing for certain how things are going to work. I think people kind of view that as, “Well, the more the publisher should know.” But sometimes we’re, and I’m saying “we” as if I’m a publisher, but when I was in-house, we would be caught off guard, too, and we would start to read the tea leaves as we were getting interest from media and recognize, “Wow! This is taking off.” But in my nearly 20 years of working in publicity, I’ve never seen a news cycle like this where it’s so difficult to penetrate. And I think, to your point, it is going to be books that don’t require news coverage to succeed. Or maybe, if they do, it’s going to be so specific and not the traditional mainstream media, which is going to be tied up in other things.

Lynn Johnston:

Yeah. And you can read trends beyond the news trends. I mean, you can see topics start to percolate, and people start to have a discussion about them. Not necessarily in the big media outlets, but on blogs or on Reddit or whatever, and you can kind of see that build. That’s where you can anticipate where a book might come in handy a year, or two years, from now.

Mike Onorato:

For sure. What is the one piece of advice you would give to any budding authors listening right now or writers as they embark on this process and this journey that they all go down? What is some advice you might want to give them?

Lynn Johnston:

My best advice is not to feel like everybody is succeeding except for you. If you go on Twitter, you see the awards, the top lists of books for the year, bestseller lists every week. You see all of these authors who, “Wow, they’re doing so great. What’s wrong with me?” “If I’ve already published a book, why didn’t my book sell as well?” “Why didn’t my book make a bestseller list?” If you’re aspiring to be an author, “Wow, all these people got published. Why am I not published?” The reality is that publishing is hard work, and I will bet you, having represented, or currently representing, some of those authors myself, that on the outside, everything looks great, but these authors are struggling just like everybody else.

Lynn Johnston:

So, “My book hit the bestseller list, but it really didn’t sell so many copies and now my publisher may not publish my next book,” for example. “I’ve gotten all of this great publicity, but it hasn’t translated into sales. Or, “I’ve sold great on my first book. I can’t come up with a second book that a publisher wants to do that I want to do.” So there is always some struggle going on once you peel back the veneer. So I would say be prepared to persevere, basically, and do what you do. And get help from people who know the business. That’s kind of my best advice.

Mike Onorato:

Right. Excellent. Certainly timely, and I love the “be prepared to persevere” and be patient, right?

Lynn Johnston:

Yeah.

Mike Onorato:

Before we go, tell us a little bit about the publishing workshop that you’re doing at the Woodstock Bookfest.

Lynn Johnston:

Well, the Woodstock Bookfest is this great festival in Woodstock, New York. It’s on its 10th year, 11th year? I think the 11th year. I’ve gone to it every year but one, and it’s my favorite weekend of the year. There are lots of authors you know, authors you don’t know, book lovers go there, writers.

Lynn Johnston:

So my workshop is on Friday of the Bookfest. It covers some of the material that I talked about here. I sit down with everybody who’s in the workshop and give them direct advice about what they should do. We talk about how to get in the right mental space so that you can succeed. We talk about how publishing works so that you can gear your material, gear your message, gear your positioning, gear who you are as an author, to work within that construct.

Lynn Johnston:

We deal with social media. So how do you deal with social media, what’s most important, what’s not, which social media, how much time should we spend? We talk about websites, what kind of website do you need to put together even before you start querying, what tools there are. My advice about a website, by the way, is not to spend a lot of money on them. I’ve had authors spend a good chunk of their advance to get this fancy website that basically doesn’t get used. With all the tools that are out there, you could almost do your website, at least before querying you can, if you don’t already have one. So we talk about that. So we talk about a lot of hands-on things and what it takes to get published.

Mike Onorato:

That sounds great. That is March 27th of this year, 2020. More information can be found at www.woodstockbookfest.com, all one word.

Mike Onorato:

Our guest has been Lynn Johnston of Lynn Johnston Literary. Lynn, thank you so much. I’ve enjoyed our conversation. Good to talk with you again, and thank you for putting up with me.

Lynn Johnston:

(laughs). Well, I hope we have another book project to work on soon!

Mike Onorato:

I hope so, too. Thank you to Lynn. This has been the All Things Book Marketing podcast. I’m your host, Mike Onorato.

Mike Onorato:

Bye for now.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for listening to this edition of the Smith Publicity All Things Book Marketing podcast. To reach us and learn about our many book marketing services, visit www.smithpublicity.com. Or send us an email to info@smithpublicity.com.